Student-Athletes Must Know NCAA Rules for Agents, Advisors

I recently came across an excellent article by David Bradley Olsen, an attorney in Minnesota, concerning NCAA rules governing “family advisors.”  The article, entitled Family advisors: What you don’t know can hurt you, is published on Let’s Play Hockey and details the NCAA’s rules prohibiting student-athletes from using agents and advisors.  Hockey players and their parents would be well-served by reviewing this article.  

NCAA Rules Concerning Agents

All student-athletes and their parents who encounter agents and advisors must be aware of the applicable NCAA rules.  Consider that NCAA rules prohibit:

  • An agreement, written or oral, with an agent for future representation.
  • Accepting transportation or other benefits from any person who represents any other person in the marketing of his or her athletic ability.
  • Accepting transportation or other benefits from an agent who has indicated that he or she has no interest in representing the student-athlete and does not represent athletes in the student-athlete’s particular sport.

Violating these rules can render a student-athlete ineligible for collegiate athletics. 

Student-Athletes May Seek Counsel from an Attorney

Of note, student-athletes are permitted to receive legal advice from an attorney, so long as that advice does not involve direct negotiations for a professional sports contract with a professional sports team.  (For more on this rule, see my post Oliver v. NCAA: The Impact of the Settlement.)

The Bottom Line

Student-athletes and their parents need to be well-informed of the applicable NCAA rules when dealing with any advisor, as that advisor could be considered an agent by the NCAA.  And dealing with an agent could cause a student to lose his or her eligibility to play collegiate athletics.

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